Blizzard 2010, Welcome snow!

Snow- a view from the door, it's 24 degrees F and Blizzard conditions.

Winter is finally upon us.  This year,we have a snowstorm with Blizzard warnings beginning on the day after Christmas.

We went out to church for the 10:30 am mass, and came outside to see the start of small snow flurries.    I asked , perhaps we can do  a little shopping for after Christmas sales, before lunch.

The snow is piling onto everything! See the snow in the light of the lamp!

We returned home by 1:00 p.m.  Lunch was delicious, Lasagna andbroccoli and honey glazed carrots, with iced green tea. Afterwards , we relaxed on the couch to watch some movies on the On-Demand channel.

Lasagna-my sister says I make the best!

Every once in a while, I would get up to look outside the windows at the blowing and swirling snow.  Judging by the increasing little pile of snow on the summer patio furniture stacked outside.

Earlier this week, we had the Moon’s Eclipse on the same night as the event of Winter Solstice.

Blizzard Dec. 26, 2010-the snowplow is out, we'll have to dig our cars out tomorrow!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Good Morning,

During the night, I dreamed that all of the snow blew away, and that everything was all clear.  I opened my eyes, jumped out of bed to look out the window.  SNOW is still here, and none of the cars have left for work at 7:15 AM.     A Snowplow passed by.


 

 

 

 

 

A snowy sunrise sky! After the blizzard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I must say, this morning, the sky just after sunrise is looking very beautiful.  So silky white, almost as if there is snow capped mountains in the distance.

Snowy sunrise! Morning after the blizzard!

Total Lunar Eclipse Coincides with Winter Solstice on Dec. 21, 2010

Okay Night Owls, this ones’s  for you!, On Tuesday am EST between 2:41 am to 3:17 am EST  ( or 17 minutes past midnight PST)  is the best time to get outdoors dressed in your woolens for a picture of the Lunar Eclipse.

This lunar eclipse falls on the date of the northern winter solstice.

“This is very rare “, according to Dr. Tony Phillips of science . nasa.gov.

However, Total lunar eclipses in northern winter are fairly common. There have been three of them in the past ten years alone.

The eclipse begins on Tuesday morning, Dec. 21st, at 1:33 am EST (Monday, Dec. 20th, at 10:33 pm PST)
Eclipse Photos: Upload your photos at weather.com/iwitness!

If you’re planning to dash out for only one quick look -Ã?  it is December, after all -Ã?­ choose this moment: 3:17 am EST (17 minutes past midnight PST). That’s when the Moon will be in deepest shadow, displaying the most fantastic shades of coppery red.
“Why red?

A quick trip to the Moon provides the answer: Imagine yourself standing on a dusty lunar plain looking up at the sky.

Overhead hangs Earth, nightside down, completely hiding the sun behind it. The eclipse is underway.

You might expect Earth seen in this way to be utterly dark, but it’s not. The rim of the planet is on fire! As you scan your eye around Earth’s circumference, you’re seeing every sunrise and every sunset in the world, all of them, all at once.

This incredible light beams into the heart of Earth’s shadow, filling it with a coppery glow and transforming the Moon into a great red orb. ”

Total lunar eclipse visible to all of the United States

How rare is that?
 

Total lunar eclipses in northern winter are fairly common.

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