Buckwheat Pancakes recipe, My grandmother’s staple food

My maternal grandmother always like buckwheat , in the form of pancakes.  My mother recalls that my grandfather made the pancakes on the weekends, adding sliced apples to it.  I am like a sponge wanting to know more details.  My mother added that there was a lady who had a store that sold the kids pieces of fudge for 2 cents a piece.  We have come a long way from those days.  Maybe 70 years ago, buckwheat was the predominant staple.  My mom said that there wasn’t much money for meat when she was growing up. Buckwheat  is high in protein, B vitamins, Folacin, Niacin, calcium.  I’m learning that it is much more nutritious than the boxes of “pancake mix ” that is commonly sold in grocery stores today.  Although , you can find Buckwheat pancake mix  in specialty stores like Stonewall kitchen ( in Vermont), a blueberry pancake mix with both whole wheat and corn flours in it or at Whole Foods in Princeton, NJ. 

Buckwheat pancakes Recipe:

Buckwheat flour,  Grind your own from buckwheat bran.

Use 1 cup white flour for every 2 cups buckwheat flour.

Into large bowl, Sift the flours together, than add 1 cup of water .

In small bowl, beat 2 eggs, then add to the flours.  Whisk by hand the flours, water and beaten eggs. You can add 4-5 TBSP of olive oil.

Ratio: 3 cups flour ( combo of buckwheat and white), 3 cups water , 2 -3 eggs.

Cover and let the mix rest in the frig for several hours or at least one hour.

Cook the crepes or pancakes on a cast iron pan that was very lightly oiled; it should not be visibly full of oil or butter.

Using a ladle, pour the buckwheat batter all at once onto the hot cast iron pan.

Wait for the pancake to cook on top until it looks dry and the edges start to curl.  Do not lift up the edges of the pancake to check, it will tear/rip the pancake.!!

The fillings can be sweet or savory.   Roll up the crepes with :

Savory: Cooked chicken, ham, Gruyère cheese.

sweet: jam or Serve with chives and a spoonful of sour cream.

Buckwheat Pancakes:

1 cup buckwheat flour

1/2 cup white flour

1 1/2 tsp baking powder

1 TBSP brown sugar

1 tsp salt

1 oz vegetable oil

1 egg

1 1/2 cups milk

Mix well.   Pour onto hot griddle.  Yield 6 to 8  ( 6 inch cakes ). 

Another recipe using BUCKWHEAT GROATS:

Good to prepare during the Lenten season.

Source:  Whole Foods website

Kasha Varnishkes

Serves 4 to 6

Kasha Varnishkes, a delightful mixture of sautéed onions, buckwheat groats and bowtie pasta, graces many Jewish holiday tables. This version features caramelized onions and hearty mushrooms.

Ingredients

1 cup whole buckwheat groats
3 tablespoons plus 1/2 teaspoon extra virgin olive oil, divided
1/3 teaspoon ground cumin
Salt to taste
4 medium yellow onions, thinly sliced
1/2 pound cremini mushrooms
2 cups dried bowtie pasta
Black pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped parsley
2 tablespoons toasted pumpkin seeds (optional)

Method

Bring 2 cups plus 2 tablespoons water to a boil in a medium pot over high heat. Stir in buckwheat groats, 1/2 teaspoon of the oil, cumin, and 1/4 teaspoon of the salt, reduce heat to low, cover, and cook for 18 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside.

Warm 2 tablespoons of the remaining oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add onions and a pinch of salt and cook, stirring occasionally, for 6 to 8 minutes. Add mushrooms, raise the heat to high, and cook for 4 to 6 more minutes, stirring frequently. Reduce the heat to low, and cook for 10 to 15 more minutes, stirring occasionally, until onions and mushrooms begin to caramelize.

Meanwhile, cook pasta according to directions on package. Drain pasta and toss with mushroom mixture.
Lightly fluff the groats with a fork and then stir them into the pasta and mushroom mixture. Season with salt and pepper. Garnish with remaining 1 tablespoon oil, parsley, and pumpkin seeds, if using.

Nutrition

Per serving: 310 calories (80 from fat), 9g total fat, 1.5g saturated fat, 9g protein, 52g total carbohydrate (6g dietary fiber, 7g sugar), 0mg cholesterol, 110mg sodium

Tags: Family FriendlyAmericanVegetarianVeganLow SodiumHigh FiberDairy Free

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LITHUANIAN Recipe, Kapusta

Lithuanian Recipe, Kapusta:  Pork and Cabbage soup

This soup recipe comes from maternal grandmother, Anna and her mother Margaret Puscavage of Pennsylvania. My mother recorded this recipe for her friends at work( International Recipes-1993). My mother was raised during The Great Depression in the 1930’s in rural coal mining towns. They baked breads from scratch as well as soups.
Good recipe to keep in mind for the soon to be approaching fall weather.
A part of my heritage is Lithuanian.

Kapoosta
Pork and Cabbage Soup

2 lbs of spare ribs cut in several pieces
1 1/2 quarts of water
salt & pepper to taste
1 large onion chopped
1 bay leaf (optional)
1 1/2 cups shredded cabbage
1/4 cup wine vinegar
1 28 ounce can tomatoes
1 medium onion minced

Directions:
Put the spare ribs in a large soup pot and cover the spareribs with water.
Add to the pot the salt, pepper, chopped onion and bay leaf.
Bring to a boil, then lower the heat and let simmer for 1 and 1/2 hours until the meat is tender and falling off the bones.
Remove the meat from the bones, chop it, and set aside.
Add the shredded cabbage to the broth and boil 5 minutes. Add the vinegar, tomatoes, and minced onion and Simmer for 20 minutes or until cabbage is tender.
Then add the chopped pork back to the pot. Season to taste and let the pork heat through.

Addendum:    May 18,2009

Hello visitors  from around the world.  Welcome!!!!!

Perhaps you have a recipe similar to mine.     Please add your version of the recipe under comments, thank-you.

Please sign my guest book and post a photo.

www.pencilsandbooks.wordpress.com

February 26, 2011

Wishing a wonderful Welcome to all who stop by to view this recipe.  Please ask my permission before reposting this recipe or any other.!!!!!  ♥    ♥

   I like to hear about other versions of this family recipe and if you prepared  this recipe.   

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