Recipe-Lithuanian Koshie

Koshie is a potato dish that my mother speaks of fondly that my grandmother used to cook.  Growing up in a small  coal-mining  town,  Koshie was baked in a coal stove.

In Lithuanian :    H”Koshie” yra bulvių patiekalas, kad mano motina kalba apie meile, kad mano močiutė naudojamas ruošti maistą. Augo mažame angliakasybos mieste, Koshie buvo kepami anglies viryklė.

My Aunt Margaret sent me this recipe via the world wide web.

 

 LITHUANIAN  KOSHI “

   £ 5 bulvės

1 vidutinis svogūnas                                                             2 kiaušiniai
petražolės dribsnių
druskos ir pipirų
1 puodelis augalinio aliejaus
 
 
 
 
 5 pounds potatoes ( Idaho )
1 medium onion
2 Eggs
 
Parsley Flakes
Salt and Pepper, to taste.
 
1 Cup Vegetable Oil
 
 
Peel potatoes and onion.  Rinse and soak in water.  Grate by hand using coarse grater into a pottery bowl.  After grating, remove excess water which accumulates to maintain a smooth batter.  Stir in beaten eggs, parsley flakes, salt and pepper.  Lastly, stir in vegetable oil mixing uniformly.  Pour into large baking pan.  Bake uncovered at 350 degrees for about two hours until crispy on top and sides.  Cool for a few minutes before serving.  Spatula out in squares.
Thanks for  visiting!  Please add your comments. Share your version  of  Lithuanian Koshie or potato kugelis.
From time to time, I see visitors to my blog from Lithuania, please feel free to add your comment about the recipe.
In Lithuanian:
Laikas nuo laiko, matau lankytojai mano dienoraštyje, Lietuva, nedvejodami pridėti savo komentarą apie receptą.
What is the difference between Koshi and Kugelis?
There is another dish called potato pudding (kugelis or kugel).  It is baked in a square pan and has Eastern -European origins.  One source, Wikipedia, states it has both German and Jewish origins.
Here is another way to prepare the potatoes for Kugelis, reposted from http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/109621

Grating the potatoes is time consuming and doesn’t remove enough of the water from the potatoes. My grandmother was born and raised in Lithuania, as well as my mother who didn’t arrive in the U.S. ’till long after the war.
They didn’t grate the potatoes..that doesn’t remove enough water, plus you have to rush to avoid brown discoloration…Instead, they used a powerful juicer..which removes nearly all the liquid neatly and leaves you with a fabulous, finely grated, non-watery potato filling…In addition, they always used 3 lbs. red and 5 or so lbs. of Idaho white potatoes…
It was/is always cooked in a speckled roasting pan…greased with butter…heavily..the richness it provides is unbeatable…of course you have to add the remaining ingredients..lol…but Some people add farina ..ACK!!!Don’t do that!!! Great kugelis isn’t easy to slice… If you make it correctly, …It should be a heavy-thick-pudding texture that is soft, but far from mushy…slightly firm…If you can slice it hot and have it retain a perfect square shape while transferring to the plate with the spatula..you haven’t done it correctly..Don’t knock the juicer till you try it… Removing moisture, grating in 1/2 the time..not too shabby…
Yes, in Lithuania they grated the potatoes..but any good cook can appreciate a new twist..as long as you don’t sacrifice the authenticity of the taste…
Sincerely, Roz

Permalink | Reply

 By Roz on May 16, 2001 04:02 PM

 

Hello everyone, below you will find a link to my  post on Lithuanian heritage and the area that my mother grew up in, in the hills of Pennsylvánia during ” the Great Depression”  titled ” Táles of Wildcat”, . Wildcat was a name of one of the villages near the coal mines.

 

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Recipe-Carrot-Potato latkes(pancakes)

https://luvsclassics.wordpress.com/2009/01/20/tales-of-wildcat-pa/

This is a delicious recipe for potato-carrot pancakes.  Since I do not have a food processor, I used a hand grater.  It was so worth the effort of the grating and I burned some calories in the process using my muscles instead of the easy way.  

 RECIPE –Carrot-Potato Latkes                                         Serves 4

For best results, cook the pancakes right after forming them.

Ingredients:

3/4 pound (about 3 medium white potatoes, peeled

8 ounces (about 3 medium carrots, peeled

1/2 cup thinly sliced scallions (about 3 scallions)

coarse salt

1 large egg, lightly beaten

1/4 cup matzo meal ( I substituted crushed saltine crackers)

1/4 cup vegetable oil, for frying

1/4 cup reduced-fat sour cream, for serving (optional).

Directions:

1.  In a food processor fitted with a fine-hole grating attachment (or on the small holes of a box grater), grate potatoes and carrots.  Transfer to a large 1/1/2 teaspoonsbowl; add scallions and  salt.  Using your hands, mix thoroughly.  Mix in egg and matzo meal until combined

 ded into 8 mounds of equal size.  ( I used a soup-spoon size to dollop out the mounds= appetizer size pancakes.

2.  In a large non-stick skillet, heat oil over medium-high heat, swirling to coat bottom of pan.  Add half the potato mounds; flatten each to a 1/2 inch thickness.  Cook until golden brown, 2 to 4 minutes per side.

 

3. Transfer to paper towels or to parchment paper to drain.  Repeat with remaining mounds (reduce temperature to medium if browning too quickly).  Sprinkle with salt, and serve with sour cream, if desired.

I used an Iron skillet and I found the pancakes to brown better that with the non-stick pan, mine is a wok style.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             

Cookbook source:

Everyday Food    December 2004.

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