Saturday – Weekend Caravan

You'll see cows grazing along a county road.

We’re going on local weekend caravan ride.  We’re taking a drive down a long and windy county road, crossing two thoroughfares along the way, we will see a pasture with cows and be tempted to stop and take more photos of the cows grazing.

cows grazing along county road 518

Emu says "hello!"

Hopewell Museum, a 45 min tour became a 2 hr with all my talking!

We rode into the town of Blawenburg and stopped there for the Reformed church’s spring flea market and sale. It was the last day of the sale, so fill up a bag for $5.00.  We put in there a spring wooden door decoration, 4 picnic paper plate holders, a small handmad wooden jar with lid, a spatula, Ekco-made in the USA, a tortilla cookbook, a Babi movie, a few more books, a tube of lotion, a Santa hat with ” Mr’ Claus” in red and green glitter.  What a find!

Then we drove into the next town of Hopewell.  It is a historic town.  After lunch, we walked across the street, to tour the Hopewell house museum.  Perferct for us , it opens at 2:00 P.M. on Saturdays.

The Hopewell Museum is a four level brownstone building   built in 1877 by Randolph Stout .     In 1967, a two story addition was added due to the generosity of Dr. David H. Hill, to display additional fine collections, including his collection of Southwestern Native American crafts.

The first inhabitants were the  marriage of Mr. Stout.   Guests came from Philadelphia, and Trenton, and other large cities for the wedding.

During this era, the  mode of transportation was horse and buggy;  Displayed in one of the rooms of the house are memorabilia   of the early Hopewell.     There are old wooden signs for places of business . For  example, the” American Grocer ” which had the option of delivery of groceries first horse-drawn, and later by car.  In the photo , there is a row of delivery cars, that look similar to the a PT Cruiser car.  photos of Main street with the horse stables.   Even the Fire Company wagon was horse drawn.

One of the museum ladies asked us if we’d like a tour , it takes only 45 minutes.  Of course , with me interjecting comments and taking a long time to gaze at each of the rooms, we were in there for two hours.

The first floor has Period rooms, a Victorian parlour with 2  mannequins dressed in vintage wedding dresses.  No you cannot take photos. 😦   On the opposite side oof the hallway in the front is the calling room.  There was an antique sofa , beautiful furniture , and the box for the ” calling cards” .  Every room in the house had a fireplace since during this time in the 1800’s, built in 1877 by Randolph Stout, there wasn’t electricity.  In 1967, a two story addition was added due to the generosity of Dr. David H. Hill, to display additional fine collections, including his collection of Southwestern Native American crafts.

We  walked upstairs, and toured about 4 or 5 rooms , some of them bedrooms, and then I was surprised that there was yet another flight of stairs for more rooms to tour.  There was a children’s toy room.  The toys included two dollhouses, and one boy’s castle complete with metal soldiers.  Also were antique dolls with porcelain faces and wax arms and legs sitting in doll carriages with big wheels.  Many of the possessions are of local origin.

On this topmost floor, was a room with Civil war, and  World War I mannequins dressed in uniform.  The uniform was a dark green britches, and a wool “Ace Wrap-looking was wound around the lower legs, to keep warm  winter when they fought.

There’s another room with Fire Department uniforms and their Fire Department hats, and photos of the horse drawn fire truck.

This is worth the time if you are enthusiastic about history, and live close to the state of New Jersey.  There are several floors, be prepared for all of the flights of stairs!!    If you’re hungry, the town has quite a few nice restaurants  and sandwich shops.  Stay for the evening, and you can take in a play at the Hopewell Dessert theater.

Ruby Tuesday-July 12, 2010

 RUBY TUESDAY

Philadelphia Museum of Art, and red cab awaits a tourist.

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

  

 

 

 

I’m joining work of the poet with a photo or two with a red theme.  Save the best for last. 

One of the current  Exhibitions at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. 

Now Through September 6, 2010
Late Renoir follows the renowned painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir through the final—and most fertile and innovative—decades of his career. At the height of his creative powers and looking toward posterity, Renoir created art that was timeless, enticing, and worthy of comparison to the greatest of the old masters, such as Raphael, Titian, and Rubens.
While walking through the exhibit the use of cameras and cell phones are not allowed.
The photo below of one of Renoir’s paintings is from the Philadelphia museum of Art ‘s website.
Girl Tatting       c.1906
Philadelphia Museum of Art’s history:

 The Philadelphia Museum of Art stands as one of the great art institutions of the world. In the over 125 years since its founding, it has grown far beyond the limits originally set for it. Today, the Museum houses over 225,000 works of art encompassing some of the greatest achievements of human creativity, and offers a wealth of exhibitions and educational programs for a public of all ages. 

Historically, the Museum was a legacy of the great Centennial Exposition of 1876 held in Fairmount Park. In March 1873, an act of the Pennsylvania State Legislature set in motion plans for the construction of Memorial Hall—a permanent building to be designed by Hermann J. Schwarzmann—which was to serve as the art gallery of the exposition. At the conclusion of the Centennial celebrations, Memorial Hall was to remain open as a Museum of Art and Industry “for the improvement and enjoyment of the people of the Commonwealth.” 

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