The Force of Life

photo of lemon in drinking glass with water
Photo by Suhairy Tri Yadhi on Pexels.com

“Infuse your life with action. Don’t wait for it to happen. Make it happen”.

Quote by Bradley  Whitford, Actor, born 1959 .

During Spark People’s 5% Spring Challenge, during one of the week’s, the focus of the week was for “ Movement, and this was totaled each day on the team’s site.
Movement to me is getting out and doing things. By engaging in activities, it’s a way of connecting with people, finding out their stories and impact on their life, how it can be connected to you. All of these movements is a learning in the process, your mind adds what you learned to previous learned knowledge and assimilate into life goals.

On a Saturday in May, there was a special event called “ AIR, “ Attitutude in Reverse” , the  website: Air.ngo
“ Miki and Friends, Open Air, Healthy in Mind and Body”
A non-profit, starting the conversation about good mental health and how dog’s help improve our lives.
The  event had : Dogs, music and Family fun. All activities provided good de-stressing and Coping mechanisms.
• Certified 5k Run & Walk

• Dog activities and demonstrations – fun for families with or without dogs!

• Butterfly Release for those who lost a loved one to suicide.

• Concert , live musicians .

• Vendors, on health & wellness, dog products, environmentally friendly, or homemade dog toys.

 

On the search for tasty soft diet options! Carrot Soup with Orange and Tarragon

Since discovering that a family member needs soft foods for her diet, I am on a quest for nutritious and tasty options.

I always like to have a bag of carrots on hand to make my own soups and stew. Carrot soup blenderized is what was prepared this Saturday morning by my husband.

The following recipe is courtesy of “In my Kitchen”.

Carrot Soup with Orange and Tarragon
Yield: 4 servings

1 TBSP butter
1 lb. carrots, peeled and chopped into small chunks
3/4 cup chopped onion
3 cups organic chicken broth
1/2 cup juice from freshly squeezed oranges
1 TBSP brandy (optional)
2 tsp chopped fresh tarragon
salt and pepper
fresh tarragon sprigs for garnish

1. Melt butter in heavy pot over medium heat. Add the onion and the carrots and saute until onion is soft, 6-8 minutes. Add broth; cover and bring to a boil. Reduce heat, uncover and simmer until carrots are tender, about 10 minutes.
2. Puree soup smooth with an immersion blender or, working in batches, in your blender or food processor.

3. In pot, stir in orange juice, brandy and chopped tarragon. Simmer for 5 minutes more to blend flavors. Season with salt and pepper and garnish with tarragon sprigs.

Orzo pasta

I’m looking at nutrition content as well as ease of eating. Orzo can be stirred into soups or added to grilled vegetables.

Orzo is made of Semolina wheat. Because this pasta shape is so small, orzo dishes can be quite dense, as the pasta will compact into a solid mass, rather than having lots of air, as is the case with bigger pasta shapes. “This is why the pasta is primarily used in soups or with soupy sauces, since plated orzo and orzo casseroles are very intense. Some people like to use orzo like rice in pilafs, deliberately aiming for a very rich, dense dish.”

Nutrition Facts :

Serving size : 2 ounces dry

Calories 210

Protein 7 grams

Total carbs 42

Cholesterol 0 Sodium 0

Fat 1 gram

Iron 10 %

Thiamine 30 %

Niacin 15 %

Ribiflavin 15 %

Folic Acid 25 %

Eat a serving of orzo, and you consume 7 g of protein. This accounts for 12.5 to 15.2 percent of the recommended daily amount.

Increase your protein consumption by eating whole-grain orzo or pairing it with seafood, such as salmon, shrimp or clams, or some other meat. The protein in orzo also helps boost your energy levels.

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/398174-about-orzo-pasta-nutrition/#ixzz1lQk07Zvr

Couscous

Both couscous and white rice contain small quantities of certain essential minerals. Couscous contains significantly more selenium, potassium and calcium than white rice.

Couscous is commonly prepared with herbs, oils and spices mixed in, which changes its nutritional profile significantly. Couscous is often prepared with tomatoes, oil, lemon juice and parsley to make the traditional chilled salad known as tabouleh. White rice is extremely bland without additional spices or seasoning. When soy sauce, for example, is added to white rice, the sodium content increases dramatically
Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/532689-nutritional-difference-between-couscous-white-rice/#ixzz1lQmsrsZN

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