Happy Saturday, Cheddar corn muffin

Cheddar

corn muffin

Cornmeal is a staple that has been used in cooking since first a colony here in the U. S. The best cornmeal to buy is stoneground , undegerminated cornmeal ( corn is not stripped of its nutritious germ). It is found in boxes in the supermarket. Enjoy your time in the grocery store, and read all the boxes/ packages that has been supplied. My usual method for purchase is to buy what is on sale, but first priority is to choose the most nutritious!!!
Store cornmeal in a cool, dry place and use within 1 to 2 months. In the summer months, keep refrigerated. Yellow cornmeal is more common than white have slightly more protein and vitamin A. There are other types, not mentioned here.

Cheddar corn muffins

3/4 cup whole wheat flour

3/4 corn meal

1/4 cup unbleached white flour

1 tsp baking powder

1/2 tsp salt

1/2 tsp baking soda

2 eggs beaten

2 tablespoons honey

1/4 cup margarine melted

1 cup buttermilk or plain yogurt

1 cup grated Cheddar cheese

1/2 cup corn kernels , optional

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

Combine first six ingredients in a mixing bowl . In a smaller bowl, combine remaining ingredients and mix thoroughly . Add the wet ingredients to dry and stir to combine. Pour into oiled muffin cup/12 cup muffin pan.
Bake for 12 to 15 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes clean, to test for done ness.

Makes: 1 dozen.

Hamburger soup, September 6, 2013

What memories do you have of school lunch or lunch as a kid?

I am reposting a recipe from blogger, ” Syrup and Biscuits” for Hamburger Soup,

One, sounds economical , and two, includes fresh veggies  and canned diced tomatoes.

School Lunchroom Hamburger Soup

yield: 6 to 8 servings

Ground hamburger meat joins lots of good vegetables for a soul-warming, gullet-pleasing, uncomplicated, big ‘ol bowl of soup.

4 large  carrots, peeled and diced
4 stalks celery, diced
2 onions, diced
1/4 cup olive oil
3 to 4 clove garlic, minced
3 pounds ground beef (85/15)
2 (14.5 oz.) cans diced tomatoes, undrained
1 (15 oz) can tomato sauce
1 quart stock
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
2 bay leaves
2 cups whole kernel corn, fresh, frozen or canned
1 (15 oz.) can LeSuer very young small sweet peas, drained
salt and pepper to taste

Heat large soup pot and add olive oil. Sauté carrots, celery and onions for 10 minutes or until soft. Season with salt and pepper. Add garlic and cook for 2 minutes.

Throw ground beef on top of all those beautiful vegetables and cook the meat until pink is gone. Don’t you dare drain away all that good juice after the meat is cooked. There’s very little fat in 85/15 ground beef. What little bit is there is going to add flavor.

Add tomatoes, tomato sauce, stock and Worcestershire sauce. Stir well.

Add bay leaves. Return to simmer. Cover and cook for 30 minutes.

Marchman Corn bread using a Cast Iron SKillet

March 19, 2013

Winter just does not want to leave us yet. Yesterday parts of the Northeast New Jersey had snow accumulating from 1 to 3 inches, and the lower part had the freezing rain.  Well, we finished at work more than an hour and half later than usual and with freezing rain coming down on top of the snow I decided not to drive home and stayed overnight at a Hotel.  It was quite nice.  Relaxing and watching TV on a newer model with HD ( High Definition) was a plus.  

Plans for appointments in the morning had to be canceled for a family member.  Enjoyed a great breakfast of scrambled eggs, home fries, bacon, yes , I Indulged ( as long as only every once in a while) fresh orange and juice. Finished with a cup of hot tea.

Once I checked out of my hotel room, I drove to Home Goods, my little luxury,  to walk around and see housewares displayed so cleverly in different bright  colors.  Who needs  a cow shaped hand soap dispenser?  I do. I like to take photographs of the local dairy farm, it is fitting to place this in the kitchen along with a timer of same theme.  Polka Dots on linens , I thought would be a fresh change for the warmer months with  latest” in- style “color for spring being  green,  pillow cases with   green polka dots fit into my decor.  I always like to stroll down the aisle and check out the utensils, slotted spoons, spatulas being my favorite skillet tool.

Marchman Cornbread

Serves 6

3/4 cup yellow cornmeal

1/4 cup flour

2 tsp baking powder

1 tsp salt

2 TBSP sugar

1 cup milk

2 eggs

3 Tablespoons oil (no cholesterol brand)

Preheat oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Find your mother’s or perhaps your grandmother’s cast iron 10 inch skillet and pour 1 TBSP oil into it. 

Pop it into the preheating oven so it will be sizzling hot when the batter is ready(wait until it is). 

Sift dry ingredients together in a large bowl.   Add oil and mix well. 

Beat eggs and milk together and add to mixture in large bowl.   It may seem runny but don’t worry.  POur batter into the hot skillet and set your timer for 15 minutes, or until the top is a lovely light brown.  Cut in generous wedges, douse with butter. Yum. 

Recipe by Josephine Marchman Nash ,

” This Little Higgy Stayed home”  cookbook .

recipe- Carolina Beef Hash

Carolina Beef Hash  
Reposted from another website.

Mike Kendrick
live’s in South Carolina, about 50 miles south of Charlotte, NC..around here we cook such things as beef hash, chicken stews, cooter stew ( snapping turtle) and catfish stews. I guess it’s a southern thing. Beef hash and chicken stew are poplar foods that are sold at local fund raisers, such as fire departments, churches and rescue squads. Beef hash is made in different ways and it depends in what part of the state you live in as to the way it is made. I guess have made a few thousand gallons of beef hash in my life time and I have my own way and style how I make it. I have tried to down size the recipe.

6 lbs boneless chuck roast

2 lbs boneless pork roast (Boston butt)
approx 2 gals water
1 pound of yellow onions (peeled & fine diced)
1/2 tsp red ground cayenne pepper
2 tsp hot sauce
1/2 tsp red crushed peppers
salt (to taste)
black pepper
1 lbs real sweet cream butter (salted)
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar

Boil beef & pork until fork tender and remove from broth and let cool, then add onions, peppers and salt, add back to broth. Shred meat with a fork or fingers until it looks stringy and add back to broth. Bring back to a boil and then reduce heat to a slow simmer for about an hour, add more water if needed and keep the pot stirred from the bottom. Add vinegar and let it simmer for another 15 minutes. The last I do is add the butter, cut off heat and cover with a lid and let it rest for 30 minutes before serving. This great served over white rice. I did my best to down size this recipe, I usually make at least 20 gallon at a time.

recipe-Amish recipe bars

Amish Recipe Bars

This recipe is reposted from the web site called  “Cooking with the Scarf Sisters”. They are not very sweet but the health benefits are worth less sugars and fats.

I’ve got two Amish and Mennonite cookbooks which I’ll have to check if there’s another version of this healthy breakfast bar.
Amish Recipe Bars

1 cup whole wheat flour
2 and 1/2 c. whole oats
3 Tbsp. raw sugar
3 tsp. baking powder
3 Tbsp. raw sugar
1 tsp. cinnamon
3 banana’s mashed
1 egg
1 cup unsweetened applesauce
1/4 cup milk
3 Tbsp. oil
4 cup raisins/walnuts…I used, 1 c. raisins, 1 cup dates and 2 cups walnuts.

Mix all ingredients (adjust to taste; you can add 1/2 tsp. salt if desired).
Drop approximately 1/4 cup full of mix per bar onto greased cookie sheet.
Bake at 350 degrees for 25 to 30 minutes.

She was deciding to use craisins instead of dates and add a teaspoon of cinnamon, to the next batch.  You can  tweak recipes to suit  your taste!
Hmmm…maybe even pineapple. What do you think?

p.s.  used cinnamon and now add it to every batch.

Enjoy!

Saint Lucia Day is December 13, 2010

Saint Lucia day is December 13, 1010 and my dad’s cousin Lucy’s birthday is today!

Happy birthday, cousin Lucy!

Saint Lucia Coffee cake wreath:

Saint Lucia Wreath

A Saint Lucia coffeecake is the traditional offering on Dec. 13. The rich dough is colored and flavored with saffron. Either a large wreath or a plate of individual buns — formed in the shapes of wreaths, crowns and cats — is perfect for a holiday brunch or when guests come to call. This authentic recipe is from Beatrice Ojakangas’s “Scandinavian Feasts” (University of Minnesota Press). If yours is a small household, divide the dough in half and make two smaller wreaths.

1 package active dry yeast
1/4 cup warm water (105 to 115 degrees)
3/4 cup milk
1/2 cup (1 stick ) butter, melted
1 teaspoon saffron threads (a good pinch)
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup currants
2 eggs, warmed
4 to 4 1/2 cups flour
1 large egg, beaten
Sugar sprinkles, optional

To make the dough: In a large bowl, sprinkle the yeast over the warm water. Add a pinch of sugar. Heat the milk and add the melted butter to it; cool until the mixture is lukewarm.

Pulverize the saffron with 1 teaspoon of the sugar, using a mortar and pestle or with the back of a spoon in a small dish. Add 1 tablespoon of the warm milk-and-butter mixture and allow the saffron to steep for 5 minutes.

Add the saffron mixture, milk-and-butter mixture, sugar, salt, currants and eggs to the yeast. Using an electric blender on medium speed, beat until blended. Add 2 cups flour and beat on medium speed for 2 minutes. Add 2 cups of the remaining flour and mix with a wooden spoon to make a medium-stiff dough. Let dough rest for 15 minutes.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured board. Knead for 8 minutes or until the dough is smooth and satiny. Place the dough in a clean, lightly oiled bowl. Turn the dough over to lightly oil the top. Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled in size, about 1 hour.

To make a braided wreath: Punch the dough down and divide into 3 parts. With the palms of your hands, roll and shape each part into a rope-like strand about 36 inches long. Braid the strands by aligning them vertically and alternately crossing each outer strand over the center strand. Shape the braid into a circle and place on a greased or parchment-covered baking sheet. Pinch the ends together where they meet to seal the strands and to conceal the beginning and end of the braid.

Transfer to the baking sheet. Brush with the beaten egg. Sprinkle with sugar sprinkles if using. Let rise for about 45 minutes or just until puffy.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until lightly browned, or until a wooden skewer inserted into the center of the dough comes out clean and dry. Cool on a rack. Makes 16 servings.

Note: To make two smaller wreaths: Divide the dough into 2 parts and braid as above. Place each wreath on a baking sheet, allow to rise and bake for about 20 minutes.

NOTES:
reposted from another blog, POST Gazette.com from Pittsburg.
As far as weather, my mother always says, “whatever Pittsburg, Pa gets, that we’re going to get”; for example SNOW is coming our way, since Pittsburgh has it.

Saint Lucia was Italian

Oddly, Saint Lucia was Italian, a Sicilian martyr. So how did an Italian girl-turned-saint come to be honored in Sweden?

There are several legends about the real Saint Lucia. One of the most common is that she was born of wealthy, noble parents about 283 AD in Syracuse, Sicily. Her father died when she was very young.

When her mother fell ill and her death appeared imminent, the desperate Lucia took her on a pilgrimage to the tomb of Saint Agatha, where miraculous healings were rumored to take place. The mother was healed and both women embraced Christianity. Together they pledged to use their wealth to help the sick and the poor.

At the time, Sicily was under the rule of an emperor, and Christianity was forbidden in favor of pagan gods. But the devout young Sicilian virgin held to her faith and distributed food to the homeless and starving.

Many of those poor families sought refuge in caves, and Lucia would make her way through the passageways with armfuls of bread. She wore a crown of candles on her head to light the way, leaving her hands free to distribute the food.

Now the plot thickens. Lucia vowed to remain a virgin. But before her father died, he had arranged her marriage into a pagan family, a deal that Lucia had no intention of honoring. Her betrothed, however, demanded her hand as his bride. Lucia flat-out refused. In a rage, the suitor took his revenge and reported Lucia’s Christian faith to the Roman officials, setting up a worst-case scenario.

On Dec. 13, 304 AD, Lucia was led before a court where she was sentenced. But she was one tough cookie. When the guards tried to drag her away, she was immovable. They tried to poke out her eyes, but she could still see. In desperation, the court ordered that she be burned. Bundles of wood were piled up around her and the fire ignited. But she was not consumed by the flames. Lucia was finally killed by the sword of one of the soldiers.

Later she was venerated as a martyr and saint, and the day of her death, Dec. 13, was named Saint Lucia’s Day.

Bringing light to Sweden

Time passed, and the day had no real significance for centuries. As Christianity spread through Europe and into Scandinavia, though, the pagan celebration of Winter Solstice had to be replaced with a Christian celebration. In keeping with “timing is everything,” winter solstice happened to fall on Dec. 13, so Saint Lucia was the natural choice.

The legend of the celebration was cemented when a terrible famine came to the Province of Varmland in Sweden during the middle ages. The poor village was starving to death. But on Dec. 13 of that year a large white ship was seen coming through the night across Lake Vanern, with a beautiful young woman standing on the bow. She was wearing a brilliant white gown, and a ring of light encircled her head.

The country people boarded the ship to find that its cargo was food, clothing and supplies. They quickly unloaded it, and as they carried the last baskets away the people looked back to see that the ship was no longer there.

Probably, it had been a much-needed supply ship from another province. But many felt in their hearts that it was a gift from Saint Lucia, and as the story spread, celebrations of Saint Lucia’s Day began. Even after the calendar was reformed and winter solstice fell on a later day, the 13th of December remained the celebration of Saint Lucia.

Visiting Lucy and family in Vermont, 2008

Moose Meat

Have you ever tried moose meat?  So glad to meet friends from all over the country and the world.  A friend in Canada made moose stew this evening.  She writes:

“moose meat stew turned out absolutely gorgeous!!!!! ”  🙂
Moose are hunted as a game species in many of the countries where they are found. Moose meat tastes, wrote Henry David Thoreau in “The Maine Woods”, “like tender beef, with perhaps more flavour; sometimes like veal”. While the flesh has protein levels similar to other comparable red meats (e.g. beef, deer and elk) it has a low fat content and the fat that is found is made up of a higher proportion of polyunsaturated fats (rather than saturated fats).[49]
Cadmium levels are high in Finnish elk liver and kidneys, with the result that consumption of these organs from elk more than one year old is prohibited in Finland.[50] Cadmium intake has been found to be elevated amongst all consumers of elk meat, though the elk meat was found to contribute only slightly to the daily cadmium intake. However the consumption of moose liver or kidneys significantly increased cadmium intake, with the study revealing that heavy consumers of moose organs have a relatively narrow safety margin below the levels which would probably cause adverse health effects.[51]

Dr. Valerius Geist, who emigrated to Canada from the Soviet Union, wrote in his 1999 book Moose: Behaviour, Ecology, Conservation:

Those who care most passionately about moose are—paradoxically—hunters, in particular people who live in wilderness and rural communities and those who depend on moose for food. In Sweden, no fall menu is without a mouthwatering moose dish. The Swedes fence their highways to reduce moose fatalities and design moose-proof cars. Sweden is less than half as large as the Canadian province of British Columbia, but the annual take of moose in Sweden—upward of 150,000—is twice that of the total moose harvest in North America. That is how much Swedes cherish their moose.

Recipe- Southern Sweet Potato Pie

Southern Sweet Potato Pie

Happy Fall, everyone.

This morning I am reposting my picture of the Sweet Potato Pie I made. My, Has it been that long??

Today is October 8, 2015.

Wishing good cheer to the lady from Arkansas  whom I spoke with last night on the Telephone who was baking a sweet potato pie. After the telephone survey, she share with me her baking secrets for this pie, a little different than my posted recipe. 

To the pleasant  Arkansas gal, ” I’m sure that piece of pie tasted good this morning with your first cuppa, cup of coffee!!!

SOUTHERN SWEET POTATO PIE

2 cups cooked, mashed sweet potatoes

1 cup firmly packed dark brown sugar

1/2 cup butter, softened

2 eggs, separated

1/4 cup ( =5 oz) can evaporated milk

1/2 tsp ground ginger

1/2 tsp ground nutmeg

1/4 tsp slat

1/2 tsp cinnamon

1 tsp vanilla

1 unbaked 10 -inch pastry pie shell

whipped topping (optional)

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.

Combine mashed sweet potatoes, brown sugar, butter, egg yolk, salt, and spices in a large bowl.  Beat with electric mixer until   light and fluffy.   Add evaporated milk. Mix just enough to combine.

NOTES: 

Beat egg whites in a separate bowl until foamy.  Gradually add sugar, beating until stiff.   Fold into the large bowl.  Bake for 10 minutes.

Reduce heat to 350 degrees F. and bake an additional 45 to 50 minutes or until set.  Cool.  Top with whipped topping, if desired.

Notes:

First peel the sweet potatoes, cut into quarters, and boil in pot filled with water until soft, 15 to 20 minutes. ; take care to drain all of the water out of the pot, and then mash.  I used a food mill since I have an antique one that my grandmother had purchased.  You can also use a ricer if you have one; this separates the strings from the sweet potato which is a little fibrous being a root vegetable.

Recipe from several sources:

CdDkitchen

http://www.southern food.about.com

Mississippi Sweet Potato Pie

http://www.mommyskitchen.blogspot.com

Apple-Blueberry Crumble

APPLE-BLUEBERRY CRUMBLE:

A healthy dessert from the Moosewood cookbook that has anti-oxidant rich fruits and heart-healthy oats and nuts.  Considered  at home with many cuisines despite it’s reputation of an  all- American dessert.

SERVES 8

Baking time: 45 to 50 minutes

Hands -on time: 15 minutes

Fruit Filling:

3 cups peeled and sliced apples

3 cups fresh or frozen blueberries

1 tsp ground cinnamon

1 Tablespoon cornstarch

1/3 cup pure maple syrup (or one of the sweeteners-1/4 cup brown sugar, or 1/3 cup thawed frozen apple juice concentrate, or 1/4 tsp powdered stevia.)

Crumble Topping:

1/2 cup rolled oats

1/2 cup whole-grain cornmeal

1/2 cup chopped walnuts or pecans 1/4 cup brown sugar or one of the sweeteners listed above for fruit filling.

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 cup vegetable oil

Directions:

1.  In a bowl, stir together the apple slices, blueberries, cinnamon, cornstarch, and maple syrup.   Spread into an unoiled, nonreactive7 x 11 inch baking pan or a 9 inch square baking pan.

Bake in a preheated 375 degree Fahrenheit oven  until bubbling, about 30 minutes.

2.  While the fruit bakes, make the crumble topping.
In a bowl, combine the oats, cornmeal, chopped nuts, brown sugar, cinnamon, and salt.  Add the oil and stir until well mixed.

3.  When the fruit has baked for 30 minutes , remove it from the oven.   Stir the fruit to settle it into the dish a little, top with the crumble mixture, and return it to the oven for 15 to 20 minutes, until the fruit looks thick  and the topping has crisped and browned.

4.  Serve hot , warm or at room temperature.

VARIATIONS:

For the fruit filling: in place of maple syrup use 1/4 cup brown sugar, 1/3 cup thawed frozen apple juice concentrate, or about 1/4 tsp powdered stevia.

For the crumble topping:

in place of the brown sugar ,use i1/4 tsp powdered stevia, or 1/3 cup maple syrup, or thawed frozen apple juice concentrate.   I f you use maple syrup or apple juice concentrate, the crumble mixture will be quite moist.

Add 2 tablespoons of ground sunflower seeds or flaxseeds to the topping.


Nutrition Information Per 1 serving of ( 8):

Calories:  271

Protein:  3 grams

Carbohydrate:  40 grams

Dietary fiber:  4 grams

Total fat:  13 grams

Saturated fat:  1 gram

Monounsaturated fat:  5 grams

Cholesterol: o mg ( zero ).

Sodium:  80 mgs


Your COMMENTS are welcomed:   Please take a few moments to say hello and tell me how the baking of your apple blueberry pie turned out.   Thanks so much! Have a wonderful day! 

 

 

 

Happy Halloween

Fall pumpkin

Happy Halloween

Trick  or Treat

IMG_6722

Doesn't this front porch beckon you to sit for a spell?

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